We Are SILENT … Because OUR Silence is THEIR Voice!

One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world.

~Malala Yousafzai

*This post is dedicated to Mrs. Campbell, our amazing Assistant Principal. She is leaving us for a brand new Principalship! We will miss her and we will ALWAYS remember how she helped us to be the BEST that we can be … she treated us with respect and dignity and love!

Today we took a vow of silence. We did this to support the We Are Silent movement. We did this to speak up for the many people around the world who are unable to speak for themselves, through our silence.

We Are Silent Because Our Silence is THEIR Voice.

We Are Silent Because Our Silence is THEIR Voice.

“Shh. We are silent. Why are we silent, you ask? Because we are the voices of those who can not speak. When do you celebrate we are silent, you ask? On April 17th. It’s a time when we choose a silent period of time to not talk at all.” ~Alex

“Shh! Today is silent day. Everyone has to be silent for a whole day. I am being silent for all of the people who can’t speak. But … it was hard being silent. Like, for example, playing a math game. It is hard to explain. And, it is hard to not be silent. I wish if it’s not silent day we could just be quiet. I wish we could do the silent day again. We did this silent stuff because other kids in the world didn’t get the chance to speak up.” ~Hannah

We STILL got to share our thinking ... we just had to WRITE everything down!

We STILL got to share our thinking … we just had to WRITE everything down!

“Today we are silent for those who are in child labour and people who are child soldiers. MY class took a vow of silence for the WHOLE DAY … six and a HALF hours! It was not hard. It was easy because I am quiet most of the time!” ~Noam

“”Today we had a vow of SILENCE for the kids that are slaves. I know it’s sad … but true. There are many other reasons why we are doing this … not just child slavery! I’m doing this for EVERYONE that’s TREATED wrong!!! I hope life doesn’t go on like this. PLEASE stop this.” ~Amy

“Shh. Today we need to be silent. This is not hard. You should try it at hone whenever you want because being silent is a very special thing to do because some kids never get to speak out loud. We get to talk every day. Why can’t they? Today I was silent for everybody. I hope that child labour would stop and that all of the children that can’t speak get to talk for the REST of their LIVES.” ~Zyne

“Shh. Today we were silent because many kids are not allowed to talk. Not because they weren’t born right. The main reason why they aren’t aloud to speak because they are in child labour. Mostly, in Africa, kids go into child labour. The school started to be silent two years ago. So, everyone, every year, is silent. I hope that child labour would stop now.” ~Issac

It's hard to imagine not being able to speak up for yourself.

It’s hard to imagine not being able to speak up for yourself.

“Shh. We have to be silent! We are doing this because some people can’t speak up for themselves. Our silence is their voice! I hope that they don’t need to be forced to work. I’m going to be silent for everyone.” ~Catherine

“We are silent because some kids aren’t allowed to speak up. Our class is going to be silent. We communicated by doing writing like I am now. My question is WHY do they do such mean things to kids? What countries do child labour? I still can’t believe that I I thought it was in the middle ages. Where do they work? In a factory or a store? I just want to know. They have the right to talk about their feelings. I wish they had what we do. Silent day is one of my MOST favourite times of the school year. I love it so much because you can do so much for people in the world that can’t speak their feelings.” ~Ethan

“Hi Blog Readers! Today we had a vow of silence. Why did we have a vow of silence? Well, some kids get taken away which is called child labour and they are not allowed to talk. Some people take children away and make them slaves.” ~Kale

We are SO lucky to have our basic needs met. We know that we are fortunate.

We are SO lucky to have our basic needs met. We know that we are fortunate.

“Shh. It’s silent day! This is going to be hard I thought to myself. After, it seemed a bit easy. Do you want to know why we are doing this? I will tell you why. We are doing silent day because some kids don’t get to speak up for themselves. This is why we are doing silent day. I hope that kids around the world get to go to school and speak up for themselves. I am doing silent day for everyone!” ~Aya

“Shh. You should be quiet, I hissed. But it’s SO hard, whined Ethan. but, you have to be silent, I said calmly. Why do we have to be quiet, anyways, said the complaining Ethan. Cuz there are many children in the world that are forced not to complain and also made to work. That sucks, said Ethan, sadly. But, still, it’s very hard! I know, I said. But, still, we should stay silent. Who are you silent for, asked Ethan. Everyone, I answered. Me too, said Ethan. Hopefully some day the children that are forced to do work will someday be in school.” ~Peng Peng

“I’m silent because some kids have lost their voices. It would be hard. Sometimes they don’t have shelter, or fresh drinking water. I loved being silent.” ~Lane

“On April 17, 2014, our school took a vow of silence. For me, it was not hard because I am silent a LOT! It was easy. A piece of cake, if you know what I mean. The reason we did it was because there are some kids in the world who have to work and do not have any play time. Some girls can not go to school. Did you know that? Our silence is THEIR voice. All day we were writing on whiteboards to talk to each other because, well, it is SILENT day! I hope that everyone can go to school and I hope everyone can have the freedom to talk! I had a GREAT time with SILENT day.” ~Jenna

Smart Doc We are SILENT

This was a CHALLENGING day … but we know it was NOTHING compared to the silence MANY people face around the world.

“Shh. It’s we are silent day in our school! It is hard but I like challenges! I don’t care if I do it wrong. We are doing this for the people who don’t get to do whatever they want. They also can’t complain about it! shocking, right? I think I will be silent for everyone because I think everyone should be free … peace NOT war!” ~Melvin

“Squeak, squeak … we wrote on whiteboards. We couldn’t talk. We are silent. The school was silent for six and a half hours. We did this at the school AND at my bus stop. My class is trying to be silent for the whole entire day. The reason we do this is because some people can’t say their feelings … or they will get hurt. It was very hard to stay quiet because it was hard to write everything or mouth the words. I was silent for everybody who can’t say or write their feelings. I hope later on all the people in the world can say their feelings.” ~Daniel

It would be VERY difficult to TRULY know what it is like to not have your basic needs met ... one can ONLY imagine.

It would be VERY difficult to TRULY know what it is like to not have your basic needs met … one can ONLY imagine.

“The vow of silence is basically being silent for people who can’t talk because they are forced to work, to be slaves, to not have clean drinking water, to not have their basic needs met. There are many other reasons to go through. Some children are forced to do child labour. For that reason we are silent for the whole entire day, but not including recess and lunch! We got inspired by Craig Kielburger.” ~Cohen

“Our silence is THEIR voice. Wow. Today was fun AND easy, I said to myself. Today we were silent all day. It was fun because you write on a board to communicate. It was easy peasy. I was silent for everybody, boys and girls, that are not allowed to talk. Because, if I do it just for BOYS that are not allowed to talk, it will not be fair. I hope those kids who work and are not allowed to talk get freedom so they could play, have fun, learn and talk instead of working in quarries and companies. I just hope that those kids who work and DON’T have rights HAVE them one day.” ~Martin

“WE ARE SILENT!!!” Why? Because there are lots of kids in the world who are taken into child labour and can’t talk. Well … they can by nobody listens to them. So, we are taking a day of silence to help those kids in the world. Is it hard, you ask? Sort of. I mean it’s hard because you want to burst out talking and easy because we know children need help in the world. So … it’s basically both! My hope is to let all the children go to school and to not be in child labour. I wish that the world would let ALL girls go to school!” ~Claire

Even naughty Nelson is silent. Together we ARE strong.

Even naughty Nelson is silent. Together we ARE strong.

We know that TRULY walking a mile in someone else’s shoes is HARD to do. We ALSO know that taking this vow of silence, for an ENTIRE day, doesn’t even BEGIN to show us the challenges faced by MILLIONS of people around the world. After all, we came to school. LOTS of people don’t GET that choice. Even though we were SILENT, we were STILL able to communicate our thoughts on our mini white boards. We have beautiful shelter over our heads, parents and teachers who love us and do EVERYTHING they CAN to help us to be the BEST we can be. We have 100s of books in our classroom … 28000 books in our school library … and probably 100s of books at HOME too! Our water bottles and drinking fountains are FULL of FRESH, CLEAN water. No. Our vow of silence wasn’t a TRUE reflection of the silence many people are forced into around our world.

But … our vow of silence today will STAY with us. We know that we are lucky. We will think of the others who HAVE no voice and we will stand with others to help CHANGE that.

Out of the silence came THOUSANDS of voices!

~Malala Yousafzai

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Save the Bilbies

A MYSTERY Package Arrives!

A surprise pack arrived for the Battalion Blogger on Tuesday ... we WONDER what it IS?  Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen :)

A surprise pack arrived for the Battalion Bloggers on Tuesday … we WONDER what it IS?
Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

On Tuesday morning, when we came in and gathered on the carpet, we spotted an unusual package sitting on the counter! Right away we could tell, by looking at it, that it had had a ROUGH journey! We could see water stains all over the surprise package. There was LOTS of duct tape and all of its corners were crumpled in! It was SO beat up … it was EVEN missing its PACKING labels! We wondered if, when it went through customs, they had to open it … because sometimes they DO … and then seal it back up!

WHERE did it COME from? What kind of JOURNEY had it been on? Some of us guessed that it had come from PERU! A few of us thought it might have come from Australia! Guess what? Guess who it was FROM? Drum roll … please … Mr. ROSS Mannell!

It sure didn't make much NOISE when we SHOOK it! Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

It sure didn’t make much NOISE when we SHOOK it!
Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

Boy, were WE excited! First, as we passed the mysterious package around … and shook it …  assessing its MASS with our hands … we took some guesses:

  • dvds
  • an echidna puppet
  • chocolate bilbies
  • a koala kleenex box cover
  • adult animal cards to go with the baby animal cards Ross sent earlier this year
  • finger puppets of the animals we researched from the cards Ross sent earlier
  • mini stuffed animals of each baby animal we researched from the cards
Thank GOODNESS Ross had packed this special package in EXPERT fashion. Its contents would NEVER have arrived intact if it HADN'T been packed so well! Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

Thank GOODNESS Ross had packed this special package in EXPERT fashion. Its contents would NEVER have arrived intact if it HADN’T been packed so well!
Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

“What a great surprise. Thank you SO much, Ross, for the gift! We wonder where you GOT the chocolate bilbies … online or in a shop? If in a shop, what shop? The chocolate bilbies are SO cute. We love their little pink noses and ears! But … we love EVERYTHING about them! Where do bilbies live? It ALMOST looks like a BUNNY! When we FIRST saw the ears, peeking out of the box, we were like, “What IS it? What IS it? WHAT IS IT?” Our first guesses were dvds, echidna puppets, chocolate bilbies, a koala kleenex box cover, adult animal cards, finger puppets of the animals we researched, and … finally … mini stuffed animals of each animal we researched! When we first opened the package, we saw LOTS of STYROFOAM. Ross, that was AWESOME packing! You can see the little feet at the bottom of the chocolates and they are SO cute! Thanks, Ross, for ALWAYS extending our learning!” ~Jenna, Catherine and Hilary :)

“Thank you for sending us an awesome package. Ross, you are very thoughtful and very smart! We shook to hear INSIDE the package because we HAD to find out what it WAS! You GUESSED it … it was CHOCOLATE bilbies! We might send you a package soon! We cut the box open because we were BURSTING with excitement! Ross YOU spoiled us!” ~Lane

Gosh ... it's going to be VERY tough deciding what to do with our new classroom guests! Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

Gosh … it’s going to be VERY tough deciding what to do with our new classroom guests!
Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

“Thank you Ross. You are very thoughtful. It had a rough journey. The package had chocolate bilbies. When I saw the chocolate bilbies they were so cute.” ~Sam

“Thank you SO much Ross! The chocolate bilbies are SO cute. Some of us want to EAT them! The package looked like it had a hard time getting here. We had NO idea it was chocolate bilbies! We think we should send YOU some chocolate BUNNIES! It was SO thoughtful of you!” ~Melvin & Kale

“Hi Blog readers! We got a surprise package in the mail from ROSS! When we opened the box it looked like it was a box of STYROFOAM! When we pulled the first layer of styrofoam out we saw SIX ears! After we took the second layer of styrofoam out, we pulled the ears and … guess what POPPED out? Drum roll, please! CHOCOLATE BILBIES! The chocolate bilbies are blue and inside their ears and their noses is the colour PINK! Once again, Ross, thank you SOOO much!” ~Noam & Claire

“Thank you SO much, Ross. They look so cute and tasty at the SAME time! It’s SO cool that you sent us chocolate bilbies … and took time our of your week to do it! We were mind blown! But, we’re TOO soft-hearted to eat them! Our class might donate some money to the bilby fund! They look like they are GREAT eating! Bye, Ross! Thanks again!” ~Alex, Amy & Ethan

“Hi Ross. Thank you for sending us that mystical package! It was VERY thoughtful of you to send us that surprise! We enjoyed opening the package! First, we saw styrofoam and then some tinfoil sticking up! When Mrs. Renton took the foil things out … GUESS WHAT/ It was BILBIES! Everyone BURST into surprise! I hope we can send something to YOU!” ~Martin, Cohen, & Zyne

“Wow! Thank you for the chocolate bilbies! They are SOO cute! Some of us really want to eat them but some of us don’t want to eat them because they are really cute! When we saw the box waiting for us we were SO excited. We took some guesses and one of the students guessed chocolate bilbies! He was RIGHT! When we opened it, we saw two ears sticking out of the box. I really wanted to eat them!!! If it wasn’t for YOU we would NOT have chocolate bilbies!” ~Hannah

“What a SURPRISE! Ross sent us not one but THREE chocolate bilbies! Hmmm. I wonder what we are going to do with themse adorable little chocolate munchkins! What do they look like, you ask? They really look like a rabbit, chocolate or not, but their tails are longer and they live in Australia! They are also really cute. Thank you, Ross, for sending those really adorable bilbies! Somehow the box looked like it had a rough journey! Ross, you are SO thoughtful. I LOVE the part when we got to hold the package … somehow we didn’t hear anything when we shook it!” ~Kelly & Kennedy

This is one of the tags that was on our chocolate bilbies. Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

This is one of the tags that was on our chocolate bilbies.
Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

We have been learning about the Save the Bilby Fund because we did NOT know that they were critically endangered.  When our chocolate bilbies arrived in our classroom, we read the special TAGS that were on each of them. We LOVE that the Pink Lady Chocolate Factory is donating 30 cents from each chocolate sale to the Save the Bilby Fund! Our class thinks it is sad that the Lesser Bilby might ALREADY be extinct and that the Greater Bilby is so close to extinction.

Before we were doing our research we thought bilbies were so TINY … but … as we READ more, we discovered that a full grown Greater Bilby can be up to 55 cm long (including their tail, which is around 29 cm). STILL … 26 cm is pretty BIG compared to what we thought! We USED to think that bilbies were TINY like MICE!

We love EVERYTHING about our chocolate bilbies ... their ears, their little pink noses ... just EVERYTHING about them! Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

We love EVERYTHING about our chocolate bilbies … their ears, their little pink noses … just EVERYTHING about them!
Photo by the lovely Mrs. Breen

Ross, we LOVED our special surprise package. Our three adorable chocolate bilbies are sitting in a safe spot on a shelf … and they watch over our learning EACH and EVERY day! We STILL haven’t decided WHAT to do with them. SOME of us think we should:

  • take a PICTURE and then … EAT them ALL up ;)
  • save ONE but EAT two ;)
  • making them the class PETS … they’d be REALLY easy to take CARE of ;)
  • invent a “chilled” glass cabinet so that we can preserve them FOREVER ;)
  • sell raffle tickets to WIN a chocolate bilby … to raise money for the Save the Bilby Fund :)
  • sell raffle tickets to WIN a chocolate bilby … to raise money for more books for the Battalion Library Project in Q’enqo Peru :)
Naughty Nelson ... PUT that bilby down ... we HAVEN'T decided WHAT we want to do with them yet!

Naughty Nelson … PUT that bilby down … we HAVEN’T decided WHAT we want to do with them yet!

We would ALL hate to see them go … so this is certainly going to be a HARD decision to make! We PROMISE to let you know what we decide to do with our special classroom guests! Thank you, Ross … you ROCK!

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

A Plan for Action

“I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library.”

~Jorge Luis Borges

This morning, we were experimenting with how strong different column shapes are. We were surprised by our discoveries … and THAT led us into an AMAZING discussion around our work with Ashli and the Q’enqo library! It’s FUNNY how our our learning often unfolds like this!

We were SHOCKED to see our cylinder holding 100 books. We were SHOCKED that 100 books was really so LITTLE!

We were SHOCKED to see our cylinder holding 100 books. We were SHOCKED that 100 books SOUNDED like SO much but was really SO little!

“Hey … hey, you! Let me tell you a story! Today, in science we did a column challenge. First, we tried the rectangular prism. It held 30 books! WOW! But … what is amazing is the cylinder column held 150 BOOKS! Ahh! Crazy! But, it made us feel bad because the Q’enqo library only has about 120 books!” ~Amy

“Did you know how much a hundred books looks like? If you think it is big it’s actually tiny compared to the books in our classroom. Don’t even mention our school library. In the Q’enqo library they have only about 120 books! So, we are going to donate the Biblioburro book to the Q’enqo library! We are also going to have a special day and raise money for the Q’enqo library! Hopefully the next year’s grade threes will help the library too!” ~Peng Peng

“Today our class did a science experiment. We made three different shapes. A cylinder, a square and a triangle. The triangle held 21 books. The square held 30 books and the cylinder held 150 books! But, then our class remembered that the Q’enqo library only has 120 books. I mean … our school library has 28 000 books and the Public Library has 115 000 books! So … then we thought of fundraising! We are going to sign a Spanish Biblioburro book to send to Ashli so the next time she goes to the library in Q’enqo she can drop off the Biblioburro book we sign! I think that it is great to have a book there with our names on it!” ~Alex

IMAGINE our surprise when our tiny little card stock cylinder could hold 120 books!

IMAGINE our surprise when our tiny little card stock cylinder could hold 120 books! WAIT … 120 books … THAT’S about as MANY as the Q’enqo library has in Peru!

“What? The Q’enqo library only has 120 books! We should do a fundraiser to get more books in the library. Books are SO important! We got an English and a Spanish version of the Biblioburro which we will all get to sign! I hope we can give them the books soon! We had a cylinder, triangular prism and a rectangular prism. The rectangular prism held 17 books. The triangular prism held 30 books … but the cylinder held 150 books! That’s MORE than the books in the Q’enqo library! We REALLY ned to get those books in the Q’enqo library!” ~Kale

“Wow! Today we found out that card stock, crafted into a cylinder can hold 150 books! That made us think about the Q’enqo library in Peru. The teacher also thought about the Q’enqo library. Then we all thought about a fundraiser so the library in Q’enqo can have MORE books because they only have 120 books. That’s not a lot. Books are important because they can keep you company and you can learn more. So … if you don’t read … start reading!” ~Isaac

“142, 143. 144, 145, 146, 147, 148. 149, 150 … we all said to count the books for a science challenge. Then we all thought of the Q’enqo library and that it only has about 120 books. We had two books of the Biblioburro. One is in Spanish. The other is in English. The Spanish book is for the Q’enqo library and the English book is for our library in the school. Both of the books we will sign. We all thought we should make a fundraiser for the Q’enqo library. I hope the Q’enqo library gets a lot of books!” ~Melvin

“What? That’s what 120 books looks like? Today we were doing a science challenge. We were putting books on top of a cylinder, a rectangular prism and a triangular prism. I couldn’t believe that the cylinder could hold that much. I think it is so sad that they only have 120 books in Q’enqo. The grade threes really want to do a fundraiser. If every one of us brought in a loonie or a twoonie we would have a LOT of money and we could donate all of that money to the Q’enqo library. Then they could buy books! I think books are important because that’s how you learn to write and learn to read. That’s why I think books are important. We even got The Biblioburro books in Spanish and English. I hope they get more books in the Q’enqo library!” ~Aya

Okay ... that's just NOT right ... that cylinder could hold 150 books? WOW! WAIT ... that's even FEWER books than they have in the Q'enqo library in PERU!

Okay … that’s just NOT right … that cylinder could hold 150 books? WOW! WAIT … that’s even MORE books than they have in the Q’enqo library in PERU!

“That is so sad, I thought because we just did a science experiment. It was called the Book Tower. Mrs. Renton made a cylinder and stacked books on top of each other and we got up to 15. We all stared at it and said that is more than the Q’enqo library. Then what we did was we decided about raising some money and donating it so they can get more books. We all agreed to it, so now we are going to raise some money. Mrs. Renton ordered a Biblioburro Spanish version book that everybody is going to sign.” ~Kennedy

“Guess what? I can’t believe that in school we did an experiment about how many books a cylinder, rectangular prism and a triangular prism can carry! Did you know that the cylinder held 150 books? I know that is very shocking! We are going to sign a Spanish book and send it to the Q’enqo library. I am glad that we are sending a book to Q’enqo Peru because they only have 120 books. Wow. That’s SO little, don’t you think?” ~Kelly

“In science we were testing how many books a cylinder could hold. After we got to 120, Mrs. Renton said that’s how many books are in the Q’enqo library. What? We all said NO WAY! So we thought we could give them a book … one for us … and one for them that we sign with all our names! Maybe we can wear pajamas, bring a stuffy and a favourite book and fundraise with a dollar! Books are important because you learn from them.” ~Ethan

“I think libraries are so close to our hearts. ♥♥ They are special because reading is one of the most important things in the world. It’s important because we can learn so many things from books. Did you know that the Q’enqo library has 120 books. Compared to our library we have 28 000 books! If we didn’t have libraries it would be sad. The Q’enqo library is like SO special to me and the rest of Peru. The Grade 3s really want to read a lot. My wish is to see the Q’enqo library.” ~Lane

WHAT?!? LOOK at what happened to the triangular prism after 21 books! The rectangular prism held 30 books ... but ... MAN that cylinder is STRONG!

WHAT?!? LOOK at what happened to the triangular prism after 21 books! The rectangular prism held 30 books … but … MAN that cylinder is STRONG!

“Oh! The Q’enqo library only has 120 books! My class is thinking that we should bring one favourite books and our awesome teddies … with pajamas … but the best part is donating money to Q’enqo. The class was doing science and the shapes were a rectangular prism, a cylinder and a triangular prism. Guess what the cylinder held? 150 books! More than the Q’enqo library. Isn’t that CRAZY? We’re signing our names on a Biblioburro Spanish book for the Q’enqo library!” ~Hilary

“Can you believe that the Q’enqo library only has about 120 books? My teacher got a book called The Biblioburro. She got two of the Biblioburros. One in Spanish and one in English. The Spanish one will go to the Q’enqo library. But, first, we are going to sign it. And, the English version will go to my school library. My school library has 28 000 books. That is a lot more books. I hope we get 28 000 books in the Q’enqo library!” ~Noam

“That’s sad. The Q’enqo library only has around 120 books. It’s heart breaking! We are giving the Q’enqo library a book called the Biblioburro in Spanish AND we MIGHT wear our pjs, bring stuffies and a favourite book … and maybe bring in some money to buy more books for the Q’enqo library! Yah! We also have the English version of it so we have the Spanish one for Q’enqo and the English one for our library! We will sign the Spanish book and send it to Ashli to deliver the book tot he library in Q’enqo Peru. I decide we NEED to get more books in the Q’enqo library.” ~Zyne

“Wow. That is so sad. The Q’enqo library only has 120 books. THAT’S SUPER DUPER CRAZY! Do you know how we got to making this blog post? Well, we were in the middle of doing a science experiment and we were putting books on a cylinder! 149, 150, 151 … oh … the last book doesn’t count … so … we had 150 books! That’s more than the Q’enqo library! And, one more fact … 150 books is LESS than ONE metre stick! So, then that means that the Q’enqo library has LESS than ONE shelf of books! Since the Q’enqo library only has 120 books then we wanted to make a fundraiser for more books. So, Mrs. Renton ordered the Biblioburro in Spanish and English. We are going to sign both books and give the Spanish book to the Q’enqo library and sign the English one and donate it to OUR school library. I LOVE when we get to donate things to people … especially the Q’enqo library! ~Claire

We were SERIOUSLY shocked to see how LITTLE space 150 books took up on one tiny bookshelf. We are INSPIRED to TAKE action! Let's DO something about that library in Q'enqo!

We were SERIOUSLY shocked to see how LITTLE space 150 books took up on one tiny bookshelf. We are INSPIRED to TAKE action! Let’s DO something about that library in Q’enqo!

“Hey! Do you know how many books are in the Q’enqo library? Just 120. And, in our public library it has 115 000! We need to fundraise so we can get more books in the Q’enqo library! Everybody is feeling sad in my classroom because it has 120 books in the Q’enqo library so we think we need to do a fundraiser by making a book day or p.j. day. We are still deciding. The kids in Q’enqo need books because they need to read. If you can not read, you don’t have many choices when you grow up. Just today, because my teacher ordered it, a book was delivered. It is called Biblioburro. It is an English version and a Spanish version. The Spanish version we will give to the library in Q’enqo and the English version we will give to our school library. Our whole class will sign the books. The Biblioburro book is based on a real man and two real donkeys. Now let’s see what will happen. I hope we fundraise a lot of money for the library!” ~Martin

“Wow! 120 books in the Q’enqo library! It sounds like a lot but it’s really a small, small amount. That is so sad. In our public library, we have 115 000 books! Hmm. Maybe we can donate books. But, that costs too much money to send! We could donate money to Q’enqo so they can buy more books. I even thought before that 120 books was so much! It’s really important to know how to read because if your imagination is bigger you can do really big changes! Our teacher got Biblioburro. One is Spanish. One is English. Mrs. Renton said we could all sign our names on it. The Spanish one we will send to Q’enqo. The English one we will give to our library.” ~Catherine

“Today we got some books and out of card stock paper we made a cylinder. On the cylinder we put 150 books. It fell when we got to 151. But, before that, when we were on 120, we had a rest. What?!? Everyone gasped when Mrs. Renton said this is the amount of books they have in the Q’enqo library. It was only a LITTLE pile. So, we decided to have a fundraiser with pajamas, stuffies and a favourite book. We got the Biblioburro book. We are going to sign the second page of the book. We are going to sign the Spanish version of it. And, the English one we are going to sign it and we are going to donate it to OUR library. When we are doing fundraising, we can bring a twoonie or a loonie. Books are so important because if you don’t have books, you can’t learn!!! I wish Q’enqo library will have tons and tons of books.” ~Hannah

“It all started when we did a science experiment. A cylinder held 150 books! Then we thought about the Q’enqo library. It only has around 120 books. When we stared at 150 books on the cylinder I was surprised. We thought 120 books was a lot of books but 150 books was SO small! Mrs. Renton ordered the book Bibliburro in English and Spanish because they speak Spanish in Q’enqo. We are going to sign it. The people who read the book enjoyed it. We are going to fundraise money to get books in the Q’enqo library. The English one we will give to our school library. We want to raise money so Mosqoy can get a part-time librarian and books for the Q’enqo library. I hope the Q’enqo library can get more books and a part time librarian.” ~Daniel

“Hmm. What can we do for a school fundraiser? Oh, I know. We can do a crazy day and bring a twoonie, then give it to Q’enqo. I am happy that we get to sign a book and give it to the library in Q’enqo Peru. It is called Biblioburro. It is about a man who has all kinds of books. Then he gets donkeys and has books and gives them to kids that do not have books. Hey, maybe you can look it up! I hope they get more books! Hey … WE can make that happen!” ~Jenna

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

~Dr. Seuss

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Global Citizenship: Learning to be the Best FOR the World!

It is time … to teach young people early on that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.

~Maya Angelou

This is a VERY special movie made especially for our School Trustees! We sure hope you ENJOY it!

We inhabit a universe that is characterized by diversity.

~ Desmond Tutu

Special credit for photos:

The cultural iceberg: The image by James Penstone is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

Einstein’s Curiosity photo: Flickr Creative Commons Bionicteaching

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , | 6 Comments

Our Papier Mache Marionettes

When I was a kid, I never saw a puppet show. I never played with puppets or had any interest in them.

~Jim Henson

Just LOOK at what Jim Henson has done SINCE then:

For the past couple of months, we have been making marionettes! It’s been a pretty AMAZING process and TONS of work, but it has been worth EVERY mucky, ooey, gooey MINUTE of it! Even though they are “finished”, we are a LONG way from being “done” with them! What follows are some slideshows showing the steps we took, and some reflections on our “highlights” SO far:

Who would EVER believe that a bunch of paper towel tubes, masking tape and newspaper could end up becoming a PUPPET?

Who would EVER believe that a bunch of paper towel tubes, masking tape and newspaper could end up becoming a PUPPET?

“It was really fun making my marionette! It is from India. Why? Because India is my second favourite country! my favourite part is seeing it finished because it almost looks like it is a real Indian girl The papier mache felt gooey. My class had to dip the paper into glue so it would stick to the newspaper face! Oh … I almost forgot to tell you this: my marionette’s name is Rabina. She wears a green dress, has long black hair, a butterfly necklace and long dangly earrings! I’m definitely making one at home so I have TWO marionettes!” ~Hilary

“What I liked about the process is cutting the hair but that’s not all I liked. I also loved stuffing the outer legs. My marionette is representing Ukraine and it is in traditional dress. What I didn’t like doing is stuffing the inner legs because it took 1 hour and 36 minutes! So, my favourite part of of doing papier mache is doing the eyelashes because it looks realistic. My mom helped me. I wonder how she made the waist without a rubber band? The marionette’s name is Daniil. His name means Worshipper of God. I chose Ukraine because my ancestors lived there. I wonder if YOU would make a marionette?” ~Isaac

“If you ask me where my marionette is from, and I told you it’s from Tunisia, what would you say? Well … it’s from Tunisia. When our class first started making marionettes we all got into a big group and did some data gathering. We had four choices: India, Tunisia, Peru and Ukraine. I chose Tunisia because my aunt was at Tunisia so I wanted to figure out more about Tunisia and tell her more about it. My favourite part was the papier mache because I really liked the feeling of the glue!” ~Alex

WHAT?!? He liked the feeling of the GLUE? Cool! Some of us liked it ... some of us TOLERATED it!

WHAT?!? He liked the feeling of the GLUE? Cool! Some of us liked it … some of us TOLERATED it!

“My favourite part of my marionette was the papier maching because paper is on my marionette. I like the ooey, gooey part! I like the papier maching part because glue is my favourite thing to do. I am REALLY proud of myself for what I did to my marionette. My marionette is from Peru because my teacher’s marionette was from Peru! The name of my marionette is Daniel. I chose that name because it is my favourite name!” ~Lane

“Hello, blog readers! This writing is about my marionette. She is from India and her name is Seasha Chara. You say “why did I choose India?” I chose India because of the sari! I was about to do Ukraine but then I decided that I wanted to do India because of the sari! Oh. I forgot. I want to tell you what Seasha Chara means. Seasha means “Great Desire” and Chara means “Quiet and Frisky”. Oh … I also need to tell you about my highlights! My highlights are:

  • That I didn’t have to roll the tube.
  • That Mrs. Renton could teach us how to.
  • That Mrs. Adamson’s class could join in the process of making them.
  • That it was awesomely fun.
  • That I could go on the internet to find a name for my marionette.

I LOVED my experience with making my marionette. I want to teach my family how to make them!” ~Claire

“My marionette’s name is Agata Adolfinn. That means “good noble wolf”. She’s from Peru. I picked Peru because I know the most about Peru. I LOVED the glue stuff!” ~Kale

FUNNY, but a LOT of students liked the flour and water glue mixture! Good thing because we spent a LOT of time in the glue!!!

FUNNY, but a LOT of students liked the flour and water glue mixture! Good thing because we spent a LOT of time in the glue!!!

“My favourite part was dressing up my marionette. I liked dressing up my marionette because I liked the sewing and the look of it when it was done. The name of my marionette is Jithuar. That means “victorious”. The country of my marionette is India and he is a monk. The reason that I chose India and a monk is because in China they also have monks TOO!” ~Melvin

“Hi blog readers! In Grade Three at my school, we made marionettes! My marionette is from India. Her name is Chandrabha Ganika. The meaning of her name is “moonlight-flower”. It reminds me of when I was on a walk and the moon was SO YELLOW! Well, anyways, I loved almost EVERYTHING! I thought at first I had to put layers of papier mache. My favourite part is that I did the papier mache. I even got a bindi from someone! I never thought of why I picked India. It MUST be that it has a LOT of JEWELRY! Oh ya … I forgot to say that I put earrings on her. I was going to put nail polish, eye shadow, and eye lashes but at least I got lipstick! Maybe you should try to make a marionette too!” ~Catherine

“Our marionettes look AWESOME! Everyone’s marionette looks GREAT! Here are some highlights. When it was done and when we got to see it at the end. Another highlight is that you can take HILARIOUS pictures. My marionette is called Borysko Vasyl which means warrior king. Cool, hey? It took me a long time to make my marionette … but it was worth it! My marionette is from Ukraine because, well, actually I just thought it was cool. Hopefully this blog post inspires you to make a marionette!” ~Peng Peng

We EVEN had to use our DESK TRAYS to wrap the wool to make our HAIR!

We EVEN had to use our DESK TRAYS to wrap the wool to make our HAIR!

“I had the … BEST time in a LONG time! You guessed it. We finished our marionettes! What was that, you want me to tell you? Her name … well it is Oksanna. She is a Ukrainian girl. Oh. I almost forgot to tell you her name means welcoming! Hmmm! What did I forget? Oh. I know. My highlight. My highlight was dressing up my marionette and also I liked covering the newspaper body with papier mache! I got to tell you, this was ALMOST as fun as creating my marionette!” ~Kennedy

“Ding, ding, ding went the bell. I went outside and went home. Mom, we have to finish my marionette today. Okay. Then let’s do it today. We are finished and let’s bring it to school today. So, I brought it in. What is your highlight, asks Hilary. Well, my highlight is sewing the dress for my marionette! What’s your favourite part of papier mache? Well, I liked doing the pole of it because it was the easiest part. Where is your marionette from? It is from Ukraine and why is because it is a beautiful country, beautiful music and awesome traditions like Easter! Her name is Kalyna Lonna. Kalyna means rose shrub. Lonna means God’s gift. I wish we could do this again!” ~Kelly

“My favourite part of making my marionette was papier maching my marionette! my marionete is from Ukraine and I did it from Ukraine because my Grandma could help me with making the clothing. She has a doll that has Ukrainian clothing and she gave me the clothes for my marionette! When I saw them when they had no clothes on they looked funny. When they were done, they looked WAY better!” ~Zyne

It's TRUE ... LOOK at how funny they look without their traditional clothing!

It’s TRUE … LOOK at how funny they look without their traditional clothing! HAIR made a big difference TOO!

“Hmm. My favourite part of making my marionette was naming her. I think this is a fabulous name: Lyuba. It means LOVE! She is from Ukraine … a wonderful place kind of known for perogies! I LOVE learning about other places and their foods! So does Lyuba! Why Ukraine, you may ask … because I LOVE how FABULOUS their CLOTHES are! I LOVE Lyuba AND the readers!” ~Amy

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“My favourite part of making marionettes was the papier mache because you got to milk the glue off the paper.” ~Sam

“Guess what we’re making … our marionettes! My favourite part was doing papier mache. Hmm. Why did I do India? I did India because I really like the sari that Mrs. Renton brought in. And, my other highlight was that my aunt was travelling to India. I can’t wait until she goes to India. Here is a third highlight. I loved the glue. It felt really good. But, at first I was too scared to put my fingers in! I didn’t want my fingers to get icky! My marionette’s name means glow spark. It was very fun doing this project!” ~Aya

“Hi blog readers! I’m going to tell you about Malka Aabha. She’s my marionette! Malka means queen and Aabha means glow! She is from India. Why did I choose India? Because of the bright colours and jewelry. My favourite part was taking her home and dressing her. I can’t wait to take her home!” ~Noam

“Wow! That is a GOOD marionette … the work is WORTH it, one of my friends said! My marionette is from Ukraine. His name is Fedir Voledymir. Fedir means “figt of God” and Volodymir means “rule with greatness”. I chose my marionette to be from Ukraine because my country is close to Ukraine! My highlight was putting on the clothing. It was fun! My other highlight was putting on the hands and papier maching! You know why papier maching is one of my favourite parts? Because it was GOOEY and because it was the last part for building the marionettes. I wish I could make MORE marionettes!” ~Martin

We learned a LOT about collaborating and paying it FORWARD by working together and helping one another!

We learned a LOT about collaborating and paying it FORWARD by working together and helping one another!

“My highlight was when I got to dress them. Me and my mom wrapped a sari. My marionette’s country is India. I chose India because Mrs. Renton did an Indian marionette too. It was also beautiful because it had a bindi on. My friend gave me a jewel but I lost it. The jewel was for a bindi so when I finished dressing my marionette I coloured the bindi red. My marionette’s name is  Lilly Tarala. It means flower honeybee.” ~Hanna

“Hmm. Why did I pick India? I think it’s because we learned so much about Peru that I want to learn more about a different country. my marionette’s name is Manorama Jyena. The meaning for Manorama is beautiful and the meaning for Jyena is princess. Jyena is SO close to my name! My name is Jenna and her name is Jyena. Can you believe that? One of my favourite parts was putting the clothing on her. But, I also liked seeing her all finished. Her clothes are SO soft! I put little jewels on the top of her dress. There is a part where the dress goes over her shoulder, and then I put jewels on that too! I LOVE my marionette and I am going to keep her FOREVER!” ~Jenna

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We still have MILES to go before we are finished with our marionettes. We’ll be working with Comic Life to share some of the photos we’ve been taking, along with some amazing information we are learning about each of our countries. After that … iMovies. If WE’RE not CAREFUL … Mrs. Renton might NEVER let our amazing marionettes come home!

We wonder:

  • What country would YOU make a marionette from? Why?
Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Making Peruvian Masks

The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.

~Pablo Picasso
Connie Clay Maker brings MAGIC to our classroom!

Connie Clay Maker brings MAGIC to our classroom!

“Yeah! Connie is here! When Connie came this was my favourite part: when I was doing the base colour. Mine was brown. We painted the masks with acrylic paints. We went from a big brush to a small brush. We did this so we could do the designs last. Another highlight was when I saw the finished masks and when the clay forms were done with designs. I was very proud of myself when we finished the masks. Also, a highlight was Connie coming in and when we felt the mask and made its shape. I liked painting small details using the silver paint. The experience was amazing!” ~Daniel

“This is so fun!!! We were painting the masks! My highlight is when we got to paint the masks. I wanted to paint it like a real ancient Peruvian mask. We were painting Peruvian masks. I used greenish, bluish colours. I used gray, gold, dark blue, silver and black. With gray I painted around the face. I did dots for the mouth and eyes. For dark blue, I painted the nose and around the eye brows. For silver, I painted whiskers. I wish I could make another one.” ~Hannah

“WOW! Connie is REALLY good at painting the ancient Peruvian masks! We especially loved painting the masks. I couldn’t paint my mask because my mask got broken in the kiln. But, at least I got a mask! Mrs. Renton still had a picture of my first mask. Thank goodness Mrs. Renton took a picture of my real one. My highlight was seeing my mask painted and finished at the end. Well, really, my highlight was that Connie took time for us and that she came!” ~Catherine

“Plunk. Plunk. PLUNK! The clay “shook” the table! This is a messy job, Kale said peacefully. My favourite part was painting the masks because when you paint you get to be all messy. My favourite part of painting would have to be doing the background! I hope we can work with Connie again!” ~Cohen

Connie showed us some AMAZING pictures of masks!

Connie showed us some AMAZING pictures of masks!

“On February 5th, Connie came into our class. You probably remember Connie. I made butterflies with her in Grade Two. Here is what I used to make my mask: newspaper, clay, tape, a rolling pin, chop sticks and a paper plate. It was a ton of fun. My favourite part was putting the designs on the clay. But, when I was looking in the books Connie brought, I saw some very cool designs that helped a lot. It was a very fun process.” ~Alex

“On February 5th, we made ancient Peruvian masks with Connie Clay Maker. That materials were: tape, newspaper and a paper plate. The nose, mouth and eyes were already made. We had to tape and tape some more! It didn’t really take us that long, maybe 10 minutes. The next thing we had to do was get clay and pat it with our palms of our hand. It was really hard … but we still did it! After that, we rolled the clay until it was as flat as a pancake. After we did rolling we pushed the clay softly on the plate. Then, we took a popsicle stick and scraped the clay off our desks. My favourite part of working was taping the nose together.” ~Isaac

“This is going to be so fun, I exclaimed to Catherine! As Connie the Clay Maker came in I got so excited. The first step that Connie told us was to put a lot of paint on the paintbrush. The second step she explained to us was to slide the brush on one side so it could be smooth. I think there is one more thing that I could tell you. Connie told us … just incase any paint got on your shirt … we had to wear paint shirts. My favourite part was putting the gold on. It was so fun working with Connie.” ~Aya

“Yeah! Connie is back, I whispered to Jenna! I can’t wait to paint with Connie, Jenna whispers. Look … it’s Connie, shouted Kennedy. Please sit down on the carpet, says Mrs. Renton to everyone. So, everybody goes to the carpet to sit down. When Connie sat down on the chair she told us about painting techniques. She told us a tip … if we painted our mask one colour and then, when you want to add your designs you have to wait because the first colour you put on is not quite dry yet. Then, it was time for Connie to leave.” ~Kelly

“Connie the Clay Maker and painting … not a lot could be better! Well, I loved that Connie came into our class, but my favourite part was painting, like I said. Personally, I loved making the ancient Peruvian masks. Our class used acrylic paint. I have some at home. Connie said that acrylics are good to paint with because, when it is dry, you can paint over it if you do not like the colour that you had before. I also liked seeing my mask all finished! When it was finished, it looked GREAT! Well, all of the experience with Connie was a highlight! I hope I get to work with Connie again!” ~Jenna

We couldn't WAIT to get started on our OWN masks!

We couldn’t WAIT to get started on our OWN masks!

“Ekk! I had the best time of my life because Connie came back and we did my absolutely favourite thing … you guess it … painting! We painted our masks. I can’t wait to tell you about the other highlights that I loved. Well … here’s the first thing I want to tell you about. I absolutely loved making the designs. But, most of all, I loved Connie coming in and teaching us and spending time with us. I loved how she took the time to come in. I hope we can do that again!” ~Kennedy

“Wow! Connie is here again! We were painting our masks today! My favourite colour and part was gold and painting the masks. We let it dry through lunch. When I saw them when they had no painting they looked hideous. When they had paint on them they looked incredible when they were all done. It was fun.” ~Zyne

“Splash. Splash went the paint. My favourite part of making the Peruvian clay masks is when I painted it. Painting my mask was fun. I like to see all the shiny colours like the gold paint. I wonder how to make the gold paint or where to buy it. I love painting clay.” ~Melvin

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“Wow! Connie is here for our masks to paint. Connie told us how to paint our masks. It was my favourite part of the day. Painting is my favourite thing to do when I go to my Grandma’s house! It’s like my mask is ancient from a journey into Peru. The best part was painting to me. It was very special to me.” ~Lane

“A few days ago, Connie came in again and taught us how to paint our masks. You paint your whole mask one colour to start. Mine is white. Then, when it dries, you paint your other colours. My favourite part was painting the tusks. I wish Connie would come in again.” `Kale

“Finally! We get to paint our masks! I was hoping to make a colourful mask but Connie said I should use a few colours. It still looked good at the end though. My favourite part was when I saw how my mask looked at the end. When we were making masks I was really disappointed when we had to wait for two weeks to paint our masks. I was excited when we were going to paint with Connie. Soon, my sister will make butterflies with Connie. I’m hoping she will enjoy it as much as me. In any other grades do you get to paint with the amazing Connie? Hopefully we do!” `Peng Peng

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“I painted it green, yellow, purple and gold. The best part was painting the mask.” ~Sam

“Oh my GOSH … I forget Connie was coming in to help paint our masks! Oh my GOSH! YES! That day my highlights were painting the background, the designs and painting it. But, the most extraordinary part was Connie coming in!” ~Amy

“That looks so cool! My favourite part was painting with the medium brush. My second favourite was rolling the clay out. It looked so cool at the end. Mine kind of looked like a fish. If my brother made one it would look like a clown. The clay was heavy. It was the best project ever!” ~Ethan

“Wow! Connie taught my class so much about how to make masks out of clay. Oh … I LOVE clay! All of it was awesome but this is what I liked the best … seeing it finished because it looks like it’s real. It has brown for the face. And,  the designs were green, blue, white and bronze.” ~Hilary

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“Hi readers. On Wednesday, February 5th, 2014, we got to work with clay. Someone came in. Her name was Connie. She works with clay. Yup. You heard that right! The stuff that comes out of the ground! And, we made a mask out of it! It was fun. She told us not to roll over the edge. She also told us to make sure that it was even. Connie took them the next day to cook. After they cooked she came back to paint our masks. That was my favourite part. My mask is gold, silver, purple, blue, bronze, black and yellow. Colourful, huh? Now, they’re on the shelves and tables around the room. I’ll never forget the day we made Peruvian masks!” ~Noam

“Wow! All of this looks so fun! Connie was in for ANCIENT PERUVIAN MASKS! My highlights, or favourite parts, were:

  • Connie came in because it rarely happens.
  • The rolling and pushing the clay.
  • Painting the mask with blue, silver and yellow.
  • Having a big nose!

I had lots of fun with Connie. I hope Connie comes again! My favourite, favourite, favourite part was feeling the mushy clay and painting the mask. Thank you SO much, Connie, for coming in! We LOVED it! I’ll never forget the day that Connie came in!” ~Claire

Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” 

~Edgar Degas 

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

AMAZING Libraries Around the World!

Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep

and continuing needs, is good for him.

–Maya Angelou

We have a special interest in libraries. We LOVE books and we feel SO lucky to be SURROUNDED by books! We also know that there are MANY children around the world who are not nearly as fortunate as we are. When Mrs. Renton shared a story about a VERY special man who is bringing books to some of these children, through the biblioburro, we were VERY surprised!

We COULDN’T believe that this could be a REAL library … but it IS. What’s even MORE cool is this is not the ONLY cool mobile library out there … there are TONS of interesting mobile libraries all OVER the world! Here are some of our discoveries:

“The biblioburro libraries bring books to kids on a donkey. And they read kids a story. I would like to go to a biblioburro library.” ~Sam

“I think that the Q’enqo library would be very, very interesting to visit. I love learning new things. I think it is interesting because I like learning about the Q’enqo library. It may have about 120 books in the Q’enqo library. In our library there are 28 000 books compared to the Q’enqo library. I’m sure it would be quite impressive to read one of the books there. We said for the past four years we’ve been helping a library in Q’enqo Peru. I think we should go to libraries all the time because it is nice to read books. Books help you learn new words and about the world.” Lane

MOST of us would LOVE to visit an ELEPHANT mobile library!

MOST of us would LOVE to visit an ELEPHANT mobile library!

“Wow. I thought Mrs. Renton was showing us a book and she showed us that in Thailand, in some parts, there are elephant libraries! We started to talk about this topic when Mrs. Renton showed us the biblioburro. It takes about 18 days (to get books) if you were the last village out of 3 villages. These libraries must carry a ton of books. The people who drive those elephants would be lucky because they get to ride elephants. I sure wish I could go to a library like that.” ~Daniel

“This is the library that we are building. We are sending more books there. Ashli helped to make this library. There are about 120 books in the Q’enqo library. Really?!? That’s IT?! Yes … only 120 books. So, we are helping them to (get more books). Some other kids do not have libraries so some people have to deliver books to them. There is a library called a camel library! Camels deliver some books to them!” ~Hannah

WHAT? ELEPHANT libraries take books to kids living in remote areas in Thailand! Each elephant can carry a LOT of books!

WHAT? ELEPHANT libraries take books to kids living in remote areas in Thailand! Each elephant can carry a LOT of books!

“In Thailand, the ELEPHANTS deliver books to children for a MOBILE library! It takes five weeks to go around one whole time (on their route). Who ever knew that ELEPHANTS could deliver books to people in Thailand? In our library we have 28 000 books! In the public library they have 115 000 books! Reading is important … it helps you find out more about the world!” ~Zyne

“Can you believe that in the Q’enqo library there are only 120 books? All of us froze when we heard that there were only about 120 books. We have 28 000 books in OUR library!!! The Public Library has 115 000 books. That is WAY more books in our library than in the Q’enqo library. I hope that we start giving books to the Q’enqo library so they have as much as US!” ~Aya

There are EVEN libraries that arrive on BOATS! IMAGINE that!

There are EVEN libraries that arrive on BOATS! IMAGINE that!

‘Hmm … what do I think about libraries around the world? Oh. I know … that we are SO lucky. We just have to walk or drive to our library but some people around the world have to walk hours or have people deliver the books to them. I think books are important because you can learn about the world … or … I can get into a good fairytale too! What? In our school we have 28 000 books in our school library and there is only 120 books in the library in Q’enqo Peru. Our class read a story called Two of Everything. In it, a man finds a doubling pot that when you put one thing in, two of that same thing will come out. Then, you can put those two things in and out comes four of that same thing … and so on. I wish we had that pot so we could put all of our library’s 28 000 books in and then give them all to the library in Q’enqo Peru. But, have half of the books so we each have the same amount. Altogether we could have 56 000 books! Oh do I hope they get more books there!” ~Jenna

There are TONS of interesting ways that library books travel to people around the world!

There are TONS of interesting ways that library books travel to people around the world!

“Wow. I did not know that elephants are librarians! In Thailand the elephants deliver books to kids for a mobile library. Isn’t that amazing? I know! How many books do the elephants carry in their boxes? Maybe 200, 400, 600? I seriously do not know. There are usually two elephants carrying books beside each other. I had fun finding that out.” ~Cohen

 “What? The Q’enqo library only has 120 books and we have lots and lots of books in our library. I hope that they can get more books in their library! I almost forgot to tell you! Mrs. Renton read us a fantastic book about libraries around the world that is called My Librarian is a Camel. One of the libraries uses elephants … actual elephants that travel around Thailand. Isn’t that cool? Hmm. What shall I tell you next? Oh, I know. In Kenya, the library uses camels that are being guided by a person that rides around looking for people that want to borrow some books. I have to tell you I had a great time sharing this with you!” ~Kennedy

“Hi blog readers! For the past three years we have been making a library in Q’enqo Peru! We helped raise money to build a library. So far we have around 120 books in the library in Q’enqo. In my school we have 28 000 books! That’s a lot of books! I hope the Q’enqo library gets MORE books!” ~Noam

The Library in Q'enqo Peru holds a special place in our hearts!

The Library in Q’enqo Peru holds a special place in our hearts!

“This is all about the Q’enqo library. In Q’enqo Peru, a small rural village up in the Andes Mountains, needed a library so the Battalion Bloggers raised money to build a library and get books, chairs, shelves, paint and much more. In the Q’enqo library right now they have about 120 books! That’s not very much because in our school library we have 28 000 and at our public library we have about 115 000 books! That’s a LOT! I love reading books because they can teach you new things and you can learn so much more. I wish that everybody in the world to read at least one book, and like it, and keep it!” ~Claire

“Wow! I didn’t know that! Did you know that biblio means books in Spanish? The person who is taking the books to kids is riding a burro. I definitely wish that we could find some awesome books and send them to Peru because they only have 120 books! We have 28 000 books in our school library. I wonder what it would be like without books?” ~Hilary

We wonder how many books an ELEPHANT library can carry?

We wonder how many books an ELEPHANT library can carry?

“Oh my GOSH! The elephants are SO cute! I am so glad these kids get books from them! I’m glad they even get to read. Books are good for you so you need them. Why, you mat say? because you can learn about anything you like or read a good old fairytale like I like to do. That’s why you need books!” ~Amy

“Did you know that in Columbia, donkeys bring books to kids to read? It’s good to read because if you know how to read and your parents don’t know how to read you can read for them. Also, if you read, it helps you to spell. In Thailand people put books on elephants as a library! I wonder how many people get the books off the elephant? On Summer break, in England, people put books on wagons and carry them around the beach! In Peru they also have donkeys (to deliver books). In Kenya they have books on camels! The camels have 2 boxes and the boxes hold 200 books. I hope I can learn more about libraries around the world!” Isaac

Books travel in different ways in Australia TOO!

Books travel in different ways in Australia TOO!

“Today, Mrs. Renton showed us the Biblioburro. You might be saying “WHAT IN THE WORLD?!?” Well, a biblioburro is a library with burros, (donkeys). In Kenya they have camels as libraries. Each camel can handle 400 books! I hope the library in Q’enqo gets more books!” ~Melvin

“What? Some people in Thailand ride elephants to deliver books! Other people in Australia use trucks to give books to kids in remote areas. My favourite one was the camel that brought books to the kids. What I would do is raise money for books. If I ran a library I would have an elephant. I love books because you can learn SOOO much. If I was writing a story it would be about a bird, named Flappy Bird. I would give it to kids. I would try to deliver all the books in the world to kids. Some people in Finland use boats to deliver books!” ~Ethan

“Did you know that there is a library that can move all over the place? It’s true. Donkeys and elephants can carry at least 100 books. My favourite one was when they use the mail express to get books in Canada, (in remote areas like Iqaluit). Amazing! If you read the book, My Librarian is a Camel, tell me YOUR favourite way to get a book! Guess what? We communicate with a young person in Peru. Her name is Ashli. We helped her make a library but right now they only have 120 books and we have about 28 000 books in our library! At the public library they have about 115 000! Wow! I’m hoping that soon the library in Q’enqo Peru will have 28 000 books TOO!” ~Peng Peng

Burrows ... wheelbarrows ... books travel the world in the MOST interesting ways!

Burros … wheelbarrows … books travel the world in the MOST interesting ways!

“Oh my gosh! Did you know that our school has 28 000 books in our library? In Q’enqo there are 120 books. Did you know that camels can carry 200 books? Today our teacher told us a story about libraries. There are some libraries that don’t have a lot of books. I didn’t know that. In the public library there are about 115 000 books. I wonder how many books an elephants and a biblioburro can hold! A biblioburro is a name for a library donkey! There are different animals across the world who carry different amounts of books to kids. My favourite library is the biblioburro!” ~Kelly

“Beep! The library truck honked! Did you know that in Australia your library might be a big truck? There are about 72 of those library trucks in the whole of Australia! These trucks carry thousands of books to the children who can not go to a city library! Some mobile libraries are more than that. There are solar powered high tech libraries! The solar panels are on the roof. Inside the truck could have computers, air conditioning units, florescent lights and other stuff. I wish I could go inside one of them!” ~Martin

A "little free library" is an AWESOME way for people to borrow or leave books! This is outside the CBC building!

A “little free library” is an AWESOME way for people to borrow or leave books! This is outside the CBC building!

Books can be dangerous.  The best ones should be labeled “This could change your life.” 

~Helen Exley 

We wonder:

  • What is the most interesting library YOU’VE ever seen or heard of?
  • What library would you MOST like to visit?
Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

A Surprise Package Inspires Action!

The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery.

~Mark Van Doren

A SURPRISE package arrived in the mail the other day … ALL the way from the OTHER side of the WORLD! It was COMPLETELY unexpected and GREATLY appreciated by ALL! You may be asking yourselves, “What in the WORLD did the Battalion Bloggers RECEIVE from the other side of the world?”

Well, we have a VERY special TEACHER in AUSTRALIA who frequently leaves comments on our blog posts. His name? YOU guessed it: Ross Mannell! Earlier in the year, when the Battalion Bloggers were BRAND new to blogging, Ross left them a few comments. The bloggers have spent a LOT of time learning how to REPLY to these comments meaningfully. We asked MANY questions to learn MORE about Ross and the beautiful land he lives in. MANY of our bloggers wanted to learn more about the ANIMALS that lived in Australia. So, our teacher on the OTHER side of the world began to add to our knowledge by sharing detailed comments and posts, written JUST for US, on his extended comments for students blog.

There is something  VERY special about receiving a surprise PACKAGE in the mail! ESPECIALLY one THIS adorable!

There is something VERY special about receiving a surprise PACKAGE in the mail! ESPECIALLY one THIS adorable!

Since Ross KNEW how keen we were to learn MORE about the animals in Australia, he sent us a care package he had collected with 36 … yup … THIRTY-SIX … different Australian ANIMAL baby cards! We are SURE glad Ross likes to shop at Woolworths! We’ve had an AMAZING adventure … a mini multidisciplinary INQUIRY … and learned SO much more about the wildlife in Australia.

LOOK at ALL these AMAZING Australian baby animals!

LOOK at ALL these AMAZING Australian baby animals!

On Monday, when we arrived, the cards were all taped to the wall outside our classroom. Each of us had a “sticky” and got to spend time reading EACH of the cards. There were twelve baby animals that lived in trees. Twelve of these baby animals lived on land AND twelve of these cards had baby animals that lived in the WATER! Oh … it was SO hard to choose just ONE baby animal to learn a little more about. MAYBE a FEW of the Battalion Bloggers will take on a triple doggy dare and do some FURTHER research at HOME! ;)

It’s FUNNY, but, once we’d place our “stickies” above the animal of our choice, we sat on the floor and took a CLOSER look. You will NEVER guess what we had created … a … GRAPH! Once we discovered it was a BAR graph we decided we needed to LABEL it! It needed a TITLE … and the horizontal and vertical axes needed to be labelled so that anyone passing by would understand what we were doing!

What? LOOK! It's a ... BAR graph! We'd better LABEL it!

What? LOOK! It’s a … BAR graph! We’d better LABEL it!

We discovered MANY interesting things while inspecting our graph. The biggest group of people chose land animals. Fewer people chose tree animals. More people chose koalas than any of the other animals. Three more people chose land animals than water animals.  There were SO many interesting bits of information we could see on our bar graph.

NEXT came the recording of our “wonders” and time on the iPads to discover MORE about the animals we had chosen! What an AMAZING day of adventure! It’s time to grab a warm drink and settle in for an enjoyable read! What follows are just a FEW of our discoveries:

Tree Animal Discoveries:

“Wow! I think it is SO cool that flying foxes are also called Fruit Bats and they eat eucalyptus flowers! Did you know their wing span is a metre wide? I thought it was so cool that there are sixty kinds of bats in Australia. They get their name because their heads look like a fox. Flying foxes are 25 cm long for an average size. Flying Foxes are members of the pterapdidoe group. There are three types of Flying Foxes: a Red Flying Fox, Grey Headed Flying Fox and Golden Brown Flying Fox. I wish I knew what part of Austalia they lived in!” ~Ethan

We EVEN laid out metre sticks to see how long the wing span was on a Flying Fox!

We EVEN laid out metre sticks to see how long the wing span was on a Flying Fox!

“Here we GO! Did you know that the Grey Headed Flying Fox is Austalia’s largest bat? Do you know what the Grey Headed Flying Fox’s scientific name is? It is Pteropus Poliocephalus! Did you know that the Grey Headed Flying Fox’s alternative name is Fruit Bat? Do you know what the Grey Headed Flying Fox’s size range is? It is 23 – 28 cm! I wonder what the other two types of flying foxes are like?” ~Melvin

“Wow! Did you know that a koala’s lifespan is up to eighteen years? Did you know that a koala can be 70 – 90 cm or 27 to 35 inches long? Koalas eat eucalyptus leaves. Koala’s are very picky eaters. Those picky little eaters! Here’s another fact about its food. If a koala can’t find any eucalyptus leaves they will not eat! A baby koala stays in his or her mother’s pouch for nine to ten MONTHS!” ~Catherine

“Did you ever wonder about koalas? Koalas live in forks of a tree. Koalas sleep in the forks of a tree for about 19 hours a day! The koalas are nocturnal, meaning that they sleep during the day and are active at night! Did you know that koalas are only found in Australia? They look like soft and cuddly teddy bears. Koalas eat eucalyptus leaves. They are very, very picky eaters. If a Koala can’t find any eucalyptus leave they will not eat at all. The oil on the eucalyptus leaves is poisonous to mammals. They live in the eucalyptus trees and the leaves provide the water that they drink. Koalas are mammals. The koala’s fur helps to keep it cool in summer and warm in the winter. It was really exciting to do this and I hope I can do it again!” ~Hilary

MANY of us just can't seem to get ENOUGH of discovering MORE about the adorable koala!

MANY of us just can’t seem to get ENOUGH of discovering MORE about the adorable koala!

“Did you know that koalas sleep in the fork of a tree? They sleep between 16 and 20 hours a day. They eat eucalyptus leaves. They are very picky eaters. If they don’t find eucalyptus leaves they will not eat. Don’t you think that’s amazing? Koalas do live a long life. They live around 12 to 16 years old. In fact the female koala lives longer than male koalas. That is amazing!” ~Aya

“Hmmm. What do I wonder about koalas? Wait … I know … what do koalas make their homes out of? The answer is koalas sleep in the day. They sleep in the nooks in trees. I did lots of research! Did you know koalas can sleep for up to 18 hours? Those LAZY koalas! These plum and fuzzy mammals were hunted in the 1920s and 1030s. I still do not know what they were hunted for. Even though koalas are called bears they are marsupials. Baby koalas are called joeys. What do koalas eat … they eat eucalyptus leaves! Guess what? Every so often koalas eat a little bit of dirt! It helps them digest eucalyptus leaves. When a baby is born it rides on it’s mother’s back, or it clings on it’s mother’s belly. What? Really? Koalas have two thumbs. Koala’s do not eat meat at all! Mother koalas are pregnant for about 35 days. Wow. Did you know when a baby koala is born it is blind and hairless. I had so much fun researching! I hope I can do this again!” ~Jenna

Land Animal Discoveries:

“Hey, red kangaroos have squared-off muzzles! Females are smaller than males, just like us! That’s a way that you can tell which is which gender. Isn’t that cool? Where do red kangaroos live, you ask? Well, they live in a lot of habitats throughout Australia and New Zealand. The red kangaroo usually is found in dry, grassy and sometimes even in desert areas. What? Red kangaroos can live by or in tropical forests. Red kangaroos eat grasses, leaves and other veggies that can be spotted by them. Red kangaroos travel in groups called mobs. Wow! Red kangaroos can jump up to nine or ten feet. They can grow up to 1.9 metres. The tail length is about 1 metre. These kangaroos are about 1.5 metres high. They can weigh up to 85 kg. I had the best time sharing my research with you!” ~Kennedy

Kangaroos ... SO much awesome learning!

Kangaroos … SO much awesome learning!

“Did you know that red kangaroos can swim? Hey, did you also know that red baby kangaroos are called joeys? I wonder how high a red kangaroo can jump? A red baby kangaroo lives in it’s mother’s pouch for about 8 months. I can’t believe that red kangaroos are mammals. If a red kangaroo is pushed under water, the kangaroo may use its for paw to hold it’s enemy under water so it drowns it. Oh my gosh. Did you know that a female red kangaroo is smaller, lighter and faster than a male kangaroo? Red kangaroos eat grass, leaves and tree bark. Wowza! I can’t believe that a red kangaroo has good eye sight but only responds to moving objects. I had a lot of fun researching!” ~Kelly

“I wonder why emus are called emus? Did you know that a group of emus is called a mob? Emus can’t fly but they can swim! When I found out that they are the second largest bird in the world, I wondered what the third largest bird is. Emus are big birds and so are their eggs. They are large and dark green. In fact, they are so dark it looks like black. Emus also eat leaves, grass and fruits, plants, insects and flowers. I want to research more about emus at home.” ~Daniel

“Have you ever seen a bilby? They are super cute! Bilbies are light grey and white with a really long black tail that has a white tip. They have a long pointy nose, big ears and are about the same size as a rabbit. I wish I had a bilby stuffy!” ~Sam

The tasmanian devil reminds SOME of us of the Bugs Bunny cartoon!

The tasmanian devil reminds SOME of us of the Bugs Bunny cartoon!

“Did you know that bearded dragons are both vegetarians and meat eaters? Bearded dragons diets are 80% bugs and 20% plants if they are young. 80% plants and 20% bugs if they are adults. The only reason I know this is because of a very special someone named … you guess it … ROSS! Because he know that we were very interested with the animals in Australia. So, he shipped us some very cool Australian animal cards. The bearded dragons life span is 7 to 10 years in the wild and 12 years if adopted. That was a lot of fun.” ~Alex

“If you want to learn about tasmanian devils, keep reading! Tasmanian devils eat insects, snakes, birds, (I don’t know hot tasmanian devils even CATCH birds), fish and anything up to the size of a wombat. The tasmanian devil is the size of a small dog like a Chihuahua, for example. Usually, tasmanian devils live in hollow logs and old abandoned wombat burrows. I wonder why the tasmanian devils can’t make their own place to live? Tasmanian devils can live up to 6 years but if they are kept they will live about 8 years. Tasmanian devils got the word devil from their screams and they got the word tasmanian from a city. Usually tasmanian devils cream when they are fighting over food or territory. I hope I can learn more about the tasmanian devil.” ~Isaac

“OM Gosh! Did you ever know that eastern blue tongued lizards do not lay eggs? Oh. I’m just doing some research on easter blue tongued lizards. They live in Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea. Their length is up to 20 inches. I don’t want to be that small! Really, they can live 10 to 15 years … not a long life. And, they eat bugs and rodents. Ugh! The eastern blue tongued lizard can lose their tail when they are frightened, run and grow a new one. I hope that we can research on Australian animals again!” ~Kale

The echidna has captures our hearts for a VERY long time!

The echidna has captured our hearts for a VERY long time!

“Hi readers! My name is Noam and I am going to tell you about short beaked echidnas. The first thing I’m going to tell you is how long echidnas can live fore. They can live for 58 years in zoos but, unfortunately, it is unknown in the wild. Echidnas are one of the two egg laying mammals. The other one is the platypus. Echidnas can live in Australia, Tasmania, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. The habitat echidnas can survive in are: scrubland, deserts and forests. The food echidnas eat is: ants, termites and earthworms. The size of an echidna is 14 to 30 inches long, depending on the species. A baby echidna is called a puggle. It crawls into it’s mother’s pouch after hatching from the egg. I hope I can do MORE research about echidnas!” ~Noam

Water Animal Discoveries:

“Have you ever seen a little blue penguin? Did you know that another name for the blue penguin is fairy penguin? Did you know they weigh about 3.3 pounds? And … did you know they live for about 6.5 years? Blue penguins are carnivores and they eat fish. Their natural predators are sharks and seals. I liked choosing it because it had dark blue feathers that were my favourite colour!” ~Lane

“Wow. That is so cool! The animal I was researching was the bottle nose dolphin. Usually when the bottle nose dolphins swim they swim with at least twelve other dolphins. This group is called a pod. Another fact is that the female is called a cow, the males are called bulls and the young dolphins are called calves. I wonder why the names are so different? Did you know that some dolphins go to murky shores and eat the fish that gets washed up? Weird, hey?!? All dolphins belong to delphindae. That is the scientific family for dolphins. The average length for an adult bottle nosed dolphin is nine feet. Also, bottle nose dolphins can weigh around 500 pounds! Hopefully you learned a lot about bottle nosed dolphins. I sure did!” ~Peng Peng

“WOW! REALLY! AMAZING! COOL! Ross sent us a surprise package with baby animals inside! Each of us were supposed to chose ONE baby animal! It was so hard to chose ONE baby animal because they were all so CUTE! I chose bottle nose dolphins. Here are some of my wonders and questions about bottle nose dolphins. Are bottle nose dolphins meat eaters or plant eaters? They are .. MEAT eaters! Why are they meat eaters? Bottle nose dolphins eat small fish such as squid, crabs, shrimp, and other smaller sea creatures. Do bottle nose dolphins have teeth? Yes. But they do NOT use their teeth to EAT! They use their teeth to help them CLICK, WHISTLE and SQUEEK! What is the scientific name? Tursious Truncatus! I bet YOU can’t say that! I have got lots more wonders and questions but I have to go. I’ll write again! See you later!” ~Claire

“Click. Click. Click. Did you know that the port jackson shark eats crabs, oysters, fish and sea snails? The port jackson shark’s scientific name is heterodontus portus jacksoni! Did you also know that the females can be 32 to 37 inches and males can be 75? They are bottom dwelling. When females lay 10 to 12 eggs, they usually are around 11 to 14 years old. Wow! That was a LOT of researching! Thank you for reading my research about the port jackson shark!” ~Cohen

This was an AMAZING discovery! If you are wondering what in the WORLD this is ... look into some Port Jackson SHARK information!

This was an AMAZING discovery! If you are wondering what in the WORLD this is … look into some Port Jackson SHARK information!

“Hey, did you know that black swans are vegetarians?! They eat vegetables, and weeks, grass and other plants. I did not know that baby black swans were vegetarian! That is so cool! Black swans have black fur over their body. But, baby black swans have white fur. I think baby black swans are so cute!!! Black swans live in Australia. I wish I had a pet baby black swan. I would make a pool in my basement for him!” ~Hannah

“Did you ever wonder what green turtles eat? Well, I did and now I know what they eat! They eat sea grass. You’re probably wondering what a green turtle is! It’s not green. They are blue with a little bit of green. their eyes are huge and cute. I think they like to sleep on beaches but that picture I saw might be a turtle laying eggs. Did you know the green turtle is names by the greenish colour of their skin? I wonder if there green cuz they eat sea grass? I wonder how awesome some other baby Australian animals are!” ~Amy

Wow! We think we LOVE surprise packages! What an AMAZING learning adventure! THANK you, Ross!

Wow! We think we LOVE surprise packages! What an AMAZING learning adventure! THANK you, Ross!

“Shh, shh, the ocean water goes slowly on the Australian shore. Yesterday all the Battalion Bloggers research an animal from the Australian wild. I chose the gracefully swimming, beautiful gray Australian sea lions. You could see them from the east coast of Australia although some have been recorded as far north as the mid north coast of N. S. W. (New South Wales). They eat crabs, little penguins, salmon, sharks, squid, and whiting, (a type of fish). Sea lions have hair similar to a dog. The Australian sea lion is a large sea mammal growing two and a half metres in length and weighing up to 220 kg. The make is called a bull. He has powerful shoulders and a very thick neck. The baby is called a pup. It could be born from January until June. Did you know that the females are always littler than the male? They reach a length of 1.8 metres and weigh about 100 kg. I wonder how fast they could swim? Well, maybe I will need a little more research! I hope to get to go to Australia to see that animal!” ~Martin

We did Math, Social Studies, Science AND writing. We learned that HOW you search for information can turn up NOTHING or turn up TONS of valuable information. We discovered that it’s BETTER to put your research into your OWN words because THEN you UNDERSTAND it … but you are ALSO being respectful of someone ELSE’S ideas and not plagiarizing! We ALSO discovered you CAN’T trust everything you read on the internet! Who KNEW?!? It’s IMPORTANT to double and TRIPLE check your discoveries sometimes because not EVERYTHING you read on the internet is TRUE!

Ross … thank you SO much for being our AWESOME teacher in Australia … Mrs. Renton LOVES having you as her partner teacher TOO! You truly ARE a teacher that inspires learning!

A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.

~Henry Brooks Adams

 

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , | 26 Comments

Stones, Reeds, Stilts … Places People Live

Home is a shelter from storms – all sorts of storms. 

~William J. Bennett

In December, while learning more about voluntary no-contact indigenous groups after an amazing Skype with Ashli and Zoe, we discovered that some indigenous groups build their houses high up in the canopy of rainforest trees! It’s funny how one question can lead to another … and another … and ANOTHER!

Because SO many of us were intrigued with these houses perched high above the ground, we HAD to learn more about where people live in the world! Here are some of our RECENT discoveries. We are CERTAIN that this investigation will lead to MANY more questions about the world … that’s what we LOVE about the LEARNING process!

“Wow! Along the Amazon River houses are built on poles. I wonder how they do that? It makes their homes safe from the floods in the rainy season!” ~Sam

Bolivia Photo by Yaara and Doron

Bolivia
Photo by Yaara and Doron

“Wow! We didn’t even know that was possible! Clay and straw houses?!? How can that be? In Gaza they build brick houses out of clay, straw and water. It’s amazing! They dig the clay where they are building the houses right out of the ground beside it. These sandy brown clay bricks are super strong and flexible which makes them more stable during earthquakes. Did you know that the bricks keep hoes warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer? These houses are sure different than the ones in Canada!” ~Lane & Amy

Cave Houses Turkey Photo by Yaara and Doron

Cave Hotel in Turkey
Photo by Yaara and Doron

“Hey, did you know that our class is studying about interesting houses around the world??? Well, we are studying about cave houses! Did you know people have been hollowing out caves to make homes for many thousands of years? People still do it today. Some ancient cave homes are hidden throughout the world. Cave houses are naturally quiet. Oh my gosh did you guys know that cave houses have constant temperature? They are cool in summer and warm in winter! Did you also know cave houses are not available anywhere but in the mountains? Hey! Read THIS interesting fact! Cave houses are also found in France, China, Italy, Turkey, Tunisia, Spain, Jordan, Australia and the United Kingdom? Are you getting hot? Well, did you know that there can be pools in cave houses? Do you want to see what a cave house is like? Well you can, at Cave Hotel … trust us … it’s awesome! In China, during the war, lots of people lived in cave houses because their houses got destroyed. In China millions of people still live in cave houses. Sometimes they even live in underground caves. Cave houses are different from your house of course! Cave houses are hard to spot but you are lucky if you have spotted one! If you want to learn more about cave houses search cave houses. We had the BEST time researching!” ~ Kennedy & Kelly

Houses carved into the mountains! Photo by Yaara and Doron

Museum carved into the mountains in Turkey!
Photo by Yaara and Doron

“Hey, Aya and Hilary, did you know that Spain has underground houses? They make most of their furniture out of anything they can find. They mostly use wood and rocks. Their underground houses are built right in the earth. They have stairs that go right down to their underground houses. The floor is made out of stone and dirt. They use dirt for the walls. They mix water and dirt to make their own clay. We hope we can do this again!” ~ Jenna, Hilary & Aya

“The houses we researched were the Hakka houses in China. The hakka people used hard soil for the building materials. There is also a building called a tulou. It is usually a large enclosed building. The outer walls have gun holes for defensive purposes. Most of the houses are circular but some of the houses are square. Usually the outer wall on the ground floor does not have windows! You can find the Hakka houses in Fujian China. We hope we can search for more interesting facts from the Hukkas.” ~ Peng Peng, Alex & Isaac

Floating Reed Islands on lake Titicaca, Peru. Photo by Yaara and Doron

Floating Reed Islands on Lake Titicaca, Peru.
Photo by Yaara and Doron

“Tip, tap, Daniel typed on the keyboard. Hey, Kale, I can’t find any good information. Kale, did you know that there are schools on the floating Peruvian Islands? We searched a different website and it said you could eat the reeds! We told Mrs. Renton that you could eat the reeds and she said maybe you could have a nibble of your house, since the whole entire islands are made out of reeds! On Wikipedia it said they made their island on the water because it would give them protection! I forgot to tell you that these islands are in Peru on Lake Titicaca! The tribe who lives on the floating reed islands are called the Uru. There are ropes attached to sticks and the sticks are driven into the island and the bottom of the lake. Mrs. Renton thought it was so the islands wouldn’t move. It was fun researching!” ~Daniel & Kale

“I wonder why the Incas expanded their land? The Urus were forced to live on the reed islands. Did you know that there are 35 floating islands on Lake Titicaca? Isn’t it cool that the roofs are waterproof? They hunt fish and shore ducks. The largest floating reed island is currently Tribuna. When the layers rot … they have to replace new layers.  Did you know that the reeds are called totora? The people wear wool so their skin won’t burn because they are at a high altitude. They put down rocks for a fire. Did you know that there are homes for 2000 Urus living on the islands? I wish we could know more about why the Incas expanded their land.” ~Zyne, Ethan & Martin

Old stone house with thatched roof in Scotland. Photo shared by Rachel and Stephen

Old stone house with thatched roof in Scotland.
Photo shared by Shelley and Michael

“Tap, tap, tap went the keyboard. Let’s look up stilt wooden houses of the Miao tribe! The stilt houses are made out of wood. The Miao folks live in a high cold mountain area which is wet. Wooden stilt houses are also known as suspended wood houses. Most people in the areas of Greenwich live in wooden stilt houses. Wooden stilt houses are thought of as living fossils because they show the history of the Miao culture for over many years. Each storey has three to five rooms. The upper layer is used to store stuff.” ~Cohen & Melvin

“Hey, Noam, did you know that in the 1400s in England they built their houses out of poop, (animal manure LR), and straw? Really! I didn’t know that! Then, England caught on fire so they decided that they would build their houses out of stone! Did you know that in England they also live in cave houses? You can find cave houses in the UK, France, China, Spain, Iran, Missouri, Australia, Arizona, Galera, Cappadocia, Vourvoulos, Turkey and many more countries! Cave houses are usually old! I hope we can research MORE!” ~Noam & Claire

We know that THESE interesting houses are only the TIP of the iceberg! There are MANY more interesting houses around the world. We’ve discovered that people are AMAZING! SO many cultures build with the materials they have at hand … the materials they find freely around the areas they build in. Ross Mannell told us about the underground houses in the outback of Australia! We learned a little about Petra, Jordan and the underground buildings in Lalibela, Ethiopia! But, as with ANY good learning, we still have SO many questions! We hope you can help us to discover even MORE about our amazing world:

We wonder:

  • have you ever visited any of these amazing homes?
  • what was it like?
  • have you visited or learned about any OTHER interesting houses that you think we should investigate?

Peace is not unity in similarity but unity in diversity, in the comparison and conciliation of differences.
~ Mikhail Gorbachev

Categories: Global Grade 3 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 50 Comments

Hola from Ollantaytambo!

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world!”

~Nelson Mandela

Yesterday, we ALL went to PERU! Yup! You read that right … THAT’S the MAGIC of SKYPE! This was our FIRST “trip” to Peru this year and, boy, were WE excited!

Technology has helped us to FLATTEN the walls of our classroom, and brought the world to US! You see, Ashli is in Peru right now. She has been SO good about sharing her experiences with us and helping to answer our “I wonders” about this beautiful South American country.

We've widdled the THREE pages of questions we started the year off with down to one ... but give us time ... we KNOW we'll think of more!

We’ve whittled the THREE pages of questions we started the year off with down to one … but give us time … we KNOW we’ll think of more!

True to form, we had a TON of questions … and SO did the OTHER four classes that JOINED us! Ashli was in the small rural weaving village of Ollantaytambo, (pronounced O-yawn-teh-tom-bo), when she Skyped with us yesterday!

What follows are our reflections from this amazing Skype:

“Yesterday we Skyped with Ashli. She’s in Peru right now. No Ashli is in a town called Ollantaytambo. She gave us a little tour of the town. It’s mostly just mountains, mountains and more mountains. Ashli said it was very hot. Did you know that there are only two seasons in Peru? Wet season and dry season!” ~Alex

“That was awesome! We Skyped with Ashli AGAIN! Her internet got cut off and we were upside down on the web cam. Ashli went to get on a roof just to Skype with us. When she called us on the roof we were right side up. Yay, everyone said!!! At the end of the Skype she gave us a view of the town she was in. I hope we get to Skype with Ashli in Peru again!” ~Amy

ollantaytambo

Ollantaytambo is BEAUTIFUL! We can SEE why Ashli likes it SO much!
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Angela Rutherford

“Ya! My class Skyped with Ashli! She told us about the town of Ollantaytambo. They speak Spanish and Quechua. On December 17, 2013, when Ashli was there, there were five earthquakes in one day. Most people spent their time outside because some roofs fell in. It was horrible! I can not wait until the next Skype!” ~Hilary

“On December 17th we Skyped with Ashli for the third time! She was in Ollantaytambo. After 14 minutes we lost connection. We tried everything until … she was on her roof! She figured out there was better internet on the roof there! And, before we hung up she showed us an amazing view! Some people said oooooo ahhhhhh when they saw the view!!! My favourite part was when she told us about five small earthquakes! Some people there thought their roof would fall down so … they slept outside! Some people weren’t scared. I had fun Skyping with Ashli in Ollantaytambo!” ~Isaac

“Woo hoo! We got to Skype with Ashli yesterday! She was in Ollantaytambo, (Oll-a-n-tan-bo), in Peru. I can’t believe that we got to Skype with someone on a different continent!!! That’s all blog readers! No! I forgot … there were five small earthquakes … some roofs fell in! Now that’s all, readers! Bye!” ~Kale

Ollantaytambo

The streets in this rural village have AMAZING architecture! No WONDER Ashli loves it so much!
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Benjamin Dumas

“Hello! Yesterday, my class had a Skype with Ashli. My favourite question was what do Peruvians do for Christmas? Well … they spend time with their family but they have no presents. It’s more a religious holiday. I loved the ruins on Pinkyluna, the mountain. They were so pretty! Our internet got cut off so Ashli ran to the top of a roof for a go at internet. I wish I could be there all day!” ~Ethan

“I wonder what Ollantaytambo looks like, I said to myself before we started our Skype. We all got settled on the carpet. Okay, everyone, Mrs. Renton said … and we started the SKYPE! The Skype was on but the screen was upside down and Ashli said it was okay that we were upside down. Half way through, the internet got cut off so Ashli ran up to a roof and the internet was back on! I could not believe that it was in real life that we were seeing the town of Ollantaytambo! The coolest thing was we saw hikers on a MOUNTAIN! I want to go and by stuff at the store!” ~Zyne

“The Grade Three classes got to Skype with Ashli! She was in Ollantaytambo. She showed her godson to us. He was playing cars. One person asked if they decorate at Christmas. Ashli said they do it more as a family, with friends, as a religious celebration. The internet got cut off! Also before the screen was doing funny things. She knew that the roof had good internet. She also told us that there were five mini earthquakes. I asked Zyne to ask my question. She said she works with six weaving villages. In one area the weaving is softer but in another area the weaving is more rough and thick. Skyping with Ashli was FUN! I wish I could go to Peru because of the Skype!” ~Daniel

Ollantaytambo

Wow! I bet MOST of us would LOVE to be in Ollantaytambo WITH Ashli right now!
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Benjamin Dumas

“Chhhhhkkkk! Oh NO! The internet connection got cut off! I hope we can still Skype, Jenna shouted! I didn’t know that. I thought they only spoke Spanish. Ashli told us Peruvians also speak Quechua in the Andes regions. But not all Peruvians speak Quechua. They do in Ollantaytambo! I hope we can Skype again!” ~Cohen

“Yesterday I was shocked about what interesting facts Ashli told us. It was cool when Ashli told us she was sitting on the roof top. And, it was scary that there were five earth quakes yesterday. Ashli told us that the people had to sleep outside because they were all scared that their houses were gonna fall. Several roofs even caved in. See you on our NEXT Skype!” ~Lane

“Oh oh! We were Skyping with Ashli! Guess what … while we were Skyping with Ashli the internet went out. Ashli had to run, with her laptop, to another house with more internet connection. She had to go on the roof. It was a rare day. It was the wet season, (summer), and it usually is raining during the wet season but it was sunny! That Skype with Ashli was awesome!” ~Noam

Ollantaytambo

You can SEE why even MINI earthquakes can cause the roofs to fall in on these Peruvian homes in Ollantaytambo.
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Benjamin Dumas

“Brriiinnnng. The Skype was opening. Yesterday we were Skyping with Ashli. She was in PERU! Her house was in the town of Ollantaytambo! Ollantay was a general. Tambo means place. My favourite part was when she showed us the view from the roof. I LOVED it! Christmas there is not like the Canadian Christmas. The Peruvian Christmas is more religious and about friends and family. The Skype was wonderful. I hope the Grade Threes have another Skype with Ashli after the winter break!” ~Martin

“Uh oh! Is this the end of our Skype? we were Skyping with Ashli … and then the internet connection broke! We waited for a few minutes. Soon we figured out that when the internet broke she put on sunscreen and went out and onto a roof because she knew it had good internet connection. That reminded her about how last year she tried to climb a mountain and show the last year’s Grade Threes the view, but the internet got cut off when she climbed a quarter of the mountain! When it was time to stop the Skype she showed us a view of Ollantaytambo. I hope to see it again!” ~Peng Peng

Ollantaytambo

We wonder if THIS is the mountain that Ashli likes to climb to sit quietly and reflect!
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Benjamin Dumas

“That’s amazing I thought to myself. Ashli had five earthquakes. The earthquakes blew some of the roofs in. The people were very scared. The houses weren’t very strong. On Christmas in Peru they light up lights in some towns. In Peru the lights sign different songs. Some people in Peru only wear their traditional clothes for celebrations!!! It was awesome Skyping with Ashli!!!” ~Aya

“Yesterday me and my class and four other classes Skyped with Ashli … but no Zoe. That’s sad. We started to Skype with Ashli but then there were some internet connection problems. So Ashli had to run up to the top of the house she was staying in in Peru. The houses in Peru are made of stone or adobe walls and tin roofs. When we Skyped with Ashli she said that the day before we Skyped with her there were five little teeny tiny earthquakes. Skyping with Ashli was fun. I hope I can Skype with Ashli and Zoe after winter break!” ~Claire

“We talked with Ashli in Peru. I asked Ashli if it was winter or summer.” ~Sam

Ollantaytambo

There is SO much Incan history … you can almost FEEL it looking at these gorgeous pictures!
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Benjamin Dumas

“As we were at school writing in our journals Mrs. Renton said today we were having a Skype with Ashli. Then it was the afternoon and then Mrs. Renton said to come to the carpet. Four classes joined us! Then suddenly Ashli lost her internet. But then we tried to video call her again. It worked. When we continued everyone noticed that Ashli was on a roof! We got to ask questions like how many seasons are there in Peru? Well, Ashli said, there are only two seasons. Before she had to leave, she gave us a tour! I will never forget what we did today!” ~Kelly

“That’s so cool I thought to myself. There is only two seasons in Peru. Dry season, winter, and wet season, summer. I wish I lived there. Those are my favourite seasons. Did you know that in Peru where Ashli was, in Ollantaytambo, tambo means place and ollantay was a general. You know what? I had the best time ever!” ~Kennedy

“Ollantaytambo! That’s the name of the town we Skyped with Ashli from. She told us that Ollantaytambo is the village she was staying in for a little bit. They celebrate Christmas. They have lights that sing all these different Christmas songs. That’s funny! Ashli said it was a bit strange, (because a bunch of different songs would be playing at the same time LR). I hope we get to have a Skype again!’ ~Jenna

Ollantaytambo

We are SO lucky to have Ashli as our teacher on a COMPLETELY different continent! Maybe ONE day some of US will work alongside you!
Flickr Creative Commons Photo by Benjamin Dumas

“There are no seven wonders of the world in the eyes of a child. There are seven million.”

~ Walt Streightiff

We still have SO many questions!

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